Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Biocell]]> http://www.scielo.org.ar/rss.php?pid=0327-954520120001&lang=en vol. 36 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.ar/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.ar <![CDATA[Correlative microscopy of Purkinje cells]]> http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0327-95452012000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The Purkinje cell and their synaptic contacts have been described using (1) light microsocopy, (2) transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and freeze etching technique, (3) conventional and field emission scanning electron microscopy and cryofracture methods, (4) confocal laser scanning microscopy using intravital stain FM64, and (5) immunocytochemical techniques for Synapsin-I, PSD9-5, GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors, N-cadherin, and CamKII alpha. The outer surface and inner content of plasma membrane, cell organelles, cytoskeleton, nucleus, dendritic and axonal processes have been exposed and analyzed in a three-dimensional view. The intramembrane morphology, in bi- and three-dimensional views, and immunocytochemical labeling of synaptic contacts with parallel and climbing fibers, basket and stellate cell axons have been characterized. Freeze etching technique, field emission scanning microscopy and cryofracture methods, and GluR1 immunohistochemistry showed the morphology and localization of postsynaptic receptors. Purkinje cell shows N-cadherin and CamKII alpha immunoreactivity. The correlative microscopy approach provides a deeper understanding of structure and function of the Purkinje cell, a new three-dimensional outer and inner vision, a more detailed study of afferent and intrinsic synaptic junctions, and of intracortical circuits. <![CDATA[Cryopreservation of Cyrtopodium hatschbachii Pabst (Orchidaceae) immature seeds by encapsulation-dehydration]]> http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0327-95452012000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of the encapsulation-dehydration technique for cryopreservation of Cyrtopodium hastchbachii Pabst seeds. Immature seeds of this species were cryopreserved by an encapsulation-dehydration technique. Seeds of five immature pods, 120 days after pollination, were encapsulated in 3% calcium alginate matrix and pretreated in liquid medium supplemented with 0.08 M sucrose (24 h), 0.15 M sucrose (24 h), 0.25 M sucrose (48 h), 0.5 M sucrose (24 h) and 0.75 M sucrose (24 h) in shaker at 60 rpm. Alginate beads were dehydrated 5 h in silicagel and immersed in liquid nitrogen for 12 h. Cryopreserved beads were thawed at 30°C for 1 min, rehydrated using the same liquid mediums (0.75 M sucrose (24 h), 0.5 M sucrose (24 h), 0.25 M sucrose (48 h) and 0.15 M sucrose (24 h)) and cultivated in half strength Murashige & Skoog medium (1962) with the addition of 2 g/L activated charcoal. Sixty four percent of seeds survived and developed into acclimatized plants after being cryopreserved. In this work, the encapsulation-dehydration technique was employed for first time in Cyrtopodium hatschbachii. <![CDATA[Optimization and comparison of two different 3D culture methods to prepare cell aggregates as a bioink for organ printing]]> http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0327-95452012000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to design and fabricate functional human tissues that are similar to natural cells and are capable of regeneration. Preparation of cell aggregates is one of the important steps in 3D tissue engineering technology, particularly in organ printing. Two simple methods, hanging drop (HD) and conical tube (CT) were utilized to prepare cell aggregates. The size and viability of the aggregates obtained at different initial cell densities and pre-culture duration were compared. The proliferative ability of the cell aggregates and their ability to spread in culture plates were also investigated. In both methods, the optimum average size of the aggregates was less than 500 µm. CT aggregates were smaller than HD aggregates. 5,000 cells per drop HD aggregates showed a marked ability to attach and spread on the culture surface. The proliferative ability reduced when the initial cell density was increased. Comparing these methods, we found that the HD method having better size controlling ability as well as enhanced ability to maintain higher rates of viability, spreading, and proliferation. In conclusion, smaller HD aggregates might be a suitable choice as building blocks for making bioink particles in bioprinting technique.